Carlo Carrà (1881-1966)
Carrà was born in Piedmont and followed in his father's footsteps as a decorator and muralist, moving to Milan in 1895, where he later met Boccioni at the Brera Academy. Carrà experimented with Divisionism, but like Boccioni was dissatisfied with current trends in painting. Together with Boccioni and Russolo he drafted the Manifesto of the Futurist Painters and the Technical Manifesto of Futurist Painting (both 1910), issuing his own manifesto The Painting of Sounds, Noises and Smells in 1913. He also developed a lifelong friendship with Soffici, travelling with him to Paris in 1914, where he was inspired to experiment with Cubism and primitivism. He continued to back the Futurist campaign, however, supporting Italy's participation in the First World War. During the war years he developed a strong interest in Italy's artistic past, particularly the work of Giotto and Paolo Uccello. With de Chirico he formed the short-lived Scuola metafisica in 1917, creating works depicting enigmatic interiors and city squares. These prepared the way for the consciously naïve figurative style he evolved after his break with de Chirico, and throughout the 1920s he adopted a naturalistic approach that remained unchanged until his death.

Carlo Carrà, Leaving the Theatre, 1910-1911
© DACS 2007